Japanese man wins custody of 13 Thai children from surrogate mother

The Thai court ruled in favor of a Japanese journalist's request for "sole custody" of 13 of her children born to some Thai surrogate mothers, AFP reported Tuesday (20/2). Thus, the Japanese man could bring the children to Japan

Mitsutoki Shigeta, 28, to be in the spotlight in the scandal of "child factory" in 2014, after Thai police found a DNA link between him and nine babies found in the care of some babysitters 24 hours, in a luxury apartment in Bangkok

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The children are estimated aged between 2 weeks and two years at the time. Since found, they are placed under state care. He also later considered a biological father for four other children.

This discovery highlights the 'wretched-rent' industry in Thailand, which at that time has not been regulated, prompting authorities in 2015 to ban foreigners from paying Thai women into surrogate mothers .

Shigeta, reportedly the son of an industrial technology tycoon in Japan, left Thailand at the time the scandal arose and never directly explained why he has many children.

He then sued the Ministry of Social Development and Humanity to court to get the right (19459007):

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Bangkok Court grants custody to Shigeta on the grounds he has a lot of money to take care of the children and has set up nurses and nannies, in a dormitory "For the happiness and opportunity that will be received by all 13 children from their biological fathers, who have no history of bad behavior, the court decides they become legitimate children of plaintiffs," the Central Youth Tribunal said in a statement. statement. The statement did not name Shigeta for reasons of secrecy.

Shigeta, who did not attend the trial, was considered the "single parent" of the children, after surrogate moms from Thailand abandoned their rights, the court added. [19659002] Shigeta's attorney said he would contact the Social Welfare Ministry to discuss the transfer of the children from state parenting. He added that the timing of custody transfers would depend on the "readiness" of the children, who are on average four years old.

"The possibility of state-owned shelter officers is also needed to stay with them to avoid sudden changes," Kong said. Suriyamontol, Shigeta's lawyer, told reporters outside the courthouse

The Ministry of Social Welfare could not immediately be reached for comment. [fw/au]

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