China denies Separatist militant contacts in Pakistan

A number of Chinese officials have denied reports that they are in contact with separatist militants in the troubled Pakistani province of Baluchistan to ensure the safety of the tens of billions of planned infrastructure projects planned in the region.

A report from The Financial Times this week said the secret talks between the two sides have lasted five years and Beijing has made direct contact with militants.

However, a top Chinese official who dealt directly with the region said he has not never heard of that gossip. The official himself does not want his name disclosed in the media.

Read also: Pakistan Politicians Denies Chinese Talks With Separatist Baluchistan

Sher Muhammad Bugti, representative of the Baluch Republican separatist group , also denied negotiations with China. Nevertheless, a number of other separatist leaders were hesitant to issue a similar denial.

China is planning to build One Belt One Road a development initiative in Pakistan called the China Economic Corridor of Pakistan. The main purpose of the initiative is to build a network of roads and trains that will connect Xinjiang Province in West China and the Indian Ocean through Pakistan. [ab/lt]

China investigates possible UN offenses related to North Korea sanctions

China is deeply concerned about reports that a country ship is transferring goods to a North Korean ship on the high seas, a move that violates UN sanctions on North Korea. China's Foreign Ministry said on Thursday that the country's authorities are conducting an investigation.

Chinese Foreign Ministry Spokesman Geng Shuang said his country would seriously handle individuals or Chinese companies that are known to be involved in the incident reported Japan earlier this week.

He further said the punishment of those involved would be imposed on the basis of strong evidence and in accordance with Chinese laws and regulations.

The Japanese Foreign Ministry said on Tuesday (20/2) a maritime watchdog and a escort ship found a North Korean flagship tanker, identified as Yu Jong 2, was next to a small ship last Friday some 250 kilometers from Shanghai in the East China Sea.

See also: Japan Tuding China Transfer Cargo to North Korea

The country of origin of the ship was unknown, but the cementer ian says, the words "Min Ning De You 078" in Chinese are written on the ship's bow, which means oil ship from Ningde city, Fujian province, China.

The ministry has reported the suspicious transfers to the UN Security Council. This is the third such incident reported by Tokyo this year. [ab/lt]

Japan Tuding China Transfer Cargo to North Korea

Japan says its military witnessed a cargo transfer between China and North Korea on the high seas and suspected that the action violated UN sanctions imposed on Pyongyang.

The Japanese Foreign Ministry said on Tuesday (2/2) a maritime ship and a escort ship found a North Korean-flagged tanker, identified as Yu Jong 2, was next to a small ship last Friday some 250 kilometers from Shanghai in the East China Sea.

The country of origin of the ship was unknown, but the ministry it says, the words "Min Ning De You 078" in Chinese is written on the ship's bow, which means oil ship from Ningde city, Fujian province, China.

Read also: North Korea Produces $ 200 Million of Trade by Violating Sanctions

The ministry has reported the suspicious transfers to the UN Security Council. This is the third such incident reported by Tokyo this year.

Pyongyang is subjected to a series of sanctions by the UN Security Council for its ongoing test of nujlir and ballistic missiles. One such sanction is to prohibit all UN members from facilitating or involved in the transfer of goods to or from North Korean flag ships. [ab/lt]

Pakistani politicians denounce China talks with Separatist Baluchistan

There is no talks between China and separatist groups in Baluchistan province, in Pakistan on the protection of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), a senator from the province told VOA.

After reported by The Financial Times, several newspapers in Pakistan say that China has secretly held talks with Baluch militants (Baluchistan natives) for more than five years in an effort to protect infrastructure projects worth $ 60 billion.

CPEC is a project which is funded by China. Once completed, the 3,000-km project will connect China with Pakistan via railways, highways and fiber-optic networks. Through CPEC, China will have access to the Arabian Sea.

Pakistan's Baluchistan province is at the heart of CPEC as it extends between China's Xinjiang region and Pakistan's Gawadar port, located in Baluchistan Province. [as/al]

Chinese Military in the South China Sea to Defend Yourself from the US

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte on Tuesday affirmed that China's military presence in the South China Sea is not intended to be a confrontation with neighboring Asian nations but to defend itself from America. [19659003] "It is not intended for us," Duterte said in a speech to Chinese businessmen of Chinese descent on Monday.

"The forces of ideology that are contradictory in the world or geopolitically have greatly changed. This is actually intended against those whom China thinks will destroy them, the Americans, "he added.

China claims almost all of the South China Sea as its territory, strategic waters worth trillions of dollars worth every year. The claim collided with the claims of Brunei, Indonesia, Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia and Vietnam.

See also: Block 4 State Determined to Keep the South China Sea Fixed Open

SOFREP publications, military news from the US Marines Special Operations Troop community, said new satellite images and aerial photographs show that Chinese-made islands are now the site of near-complete air and sea bases, and new development continues even though diplomatic dialogue continues between China and other countries claiming the territory. "

President Rodrigo Duterte said the building of military bases on China-made islands was a defense against America, not to attack neighboring Asian nations.

Duterte also blamed the previous Philippine government for not building defense in the Spratly archipelago when China just started build artificial islands.

Americans have condemned the construction of Chinese military facilities on the artificial islands and are concerned that the facility could be used to restrict free movement along the trade route.

China and the Philippines have long been in dispute over the Chinese Sea South, but relations are improving under Duterte, who approached Beijing in the hope of gaining business and investment.

In 2014, Beijing began expanding seven coral islands in the Spratly, reclaimed and built artificial islands which, according to aerial and satellite imagery, now become bases military with runways, ports, and locations of air and ground-to-air defense missiles.

Duterte defends himself against critics who say he did not do enough to protect Filipino interests in the South China Sea. He said "it will not risk the lives of Filipinos just to die in vain, I will not advance to an impossible battle I win." [ds]