Climate: A catastrophic slaughter in Australia's Great Barrier Reef

Climate change threatens more and more what is considered a jewel of the world heritage of humanity: the Great Barrier Reef in Australia . According to a study published in the journal Nature Wednesday, April 18, 2018, the past years were black for the latter. She suffered a "catastrophic" hecatomb of her corals during a very marked heat wave in 2016 threatening a greater diversity of life than hitherto estimated. Thus, the reefs have been hard hit by the increase in water temperatures following global warming.

Since 1981, The coral reef is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It stretches about 348,000 square kilometers along the Australian coast making it the largest coral ensemble in the world. The report notes that about 30% of the coral reefs died during the heat wave between March and November 2016. These dates represent the first episode of two consecutive years of bleaching.

Pantry and Shelter [19659004TerryHuguesco-authorofthestudyanddirectoroftheCenterofExcellenceforCoralReefStudiesatJamesCookUniversitytoldAFPthatthemostendangeredcoralsarethosewithbrancheslikethecoraltablesthatprovidetheirhidingplacesforjuvenilefishIndeedcoralreefsserveashabitatforothermarinecreatures" The corals most likely to hold the shock are smooth, melon-shaped said the researcher. These corals do not have too much trouble building their skeleton but they are not very useful for habitat "

Researchers call for the protection of surviving corals. These are estimated at one billion. To this end, the commitments made in the Paris Agreement must absolutely be respected.

Coral reefs cover less than 0.2% of the ocean's surface but are home to 30% of marine animal and plant species. They protect them from predators and serve as their pantry. Coral reefs also contribute to coastal protection, human nutrition and tourism.

In Australia, "catastrophic" hecatomb of corals in the Great Barrier

Australia's Great Barrier Reef, a world heritage gem of humanity, suffered a "catastrophic" hecatomb of its corals during a heated heat wave in 2016, threatening a greater diversity of marine life than hitherto estimated , warns study Thursday.

About 30% of the corals of the vast ensemble died during the heat wave between March and November 2016, the first episode of two consecutive years of bleaching.

Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1981, the reef extends over approximately 348,000 square kilometers along the Australian coast and is the largest coral reef in the world.

Based on published survey by the scientific journal Nature, coral, which is home to other marine creatures, has been hard hit by rising water temperatures as a result of global warming.

Terry Hugues, co-author of study and director of the Center of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University told AFP that the most endangered species are branch corals such as coral reefs that provide hiding places for juvenile fish

The corals most likely to hold the shock are smooth, melon-shaped, the researcher continued. These corals do not have too much trouble building their skeleton but "they are not very useful for habitat," adds Hugues.

During the bleaching of 2016, corals from the northern part of the Great barrier suffered a wave of "catastrophic deaths," the study continues.

"This coral dieback has caused radical changes in species diversity in hundreds of individual reefs, where mature and diverse reef communities are turning into more degraded systems, where only a few enduring species survive," writes Andrew Baird, other scientist

Bleaching is a phenomenon of withering which results in a discoloration of corals. Under the pressure of factors such as warming, stressed corals expel the algae with which they have a symbiotic relationship, and give them color and energy.

The study calls for the protection of surviving corals, estimated at about one billion .

"These are the ones who will recharge and re-inhabit altered reefs," says Hugues, adding that water quality needs to be improved by reducing coastal pollution.

to limit global warming as in the Paris agreement are also crucial.

"We had four bleaching episodes (1998, 2002, 2016 and 2017) on the Great Barrier with an overall temperature rise of 1 ° C," says Hugues. "If we continue with our emissions as if nothing had happened, I do not think the Barrier will survive it."

Reefs cover less than 0.2% of the ocean surface but are home to 30% of animal species and marine plants, protecting them from predators and serving as their pantry. They contribute to coastal protection, human nutrition, and tourism.

"Castastrophic" hecatomb of corals in the Great Barrier (study)

Australia's Great Barrier Reef, a world heritage gem of humanity, suffered a "catastrophic" hecatomb of its corals during a heated heat wave in 2016, threatening a greater diversity of marine life than hitherto estimated , warns study Thursday.

About 30% of the corals of the vast ensemble died during the heat wave between March and November 2016, the first episode of two consecutive years of bleaching.

Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1981, the reef extends over approximately 348,000 square kilometers along the Australian coast and is the largest coral reef in the world.

Based on published survey by the scientific journal Nature, coral, which is home to other marine creatures, has been hard hit by the rise in water temperatures following global warming.

 The Great Barrier Reef (AFP - dmk / ahu, A. Leung / J. Saeki)

The Great Barrier Reef (AFP – dmk / ahu, A. Leung / J. Saeki)

Terry Hughes, co-author of the study and director of the Center of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University, told AFP that the most endangered species are branch corals such as coral reefs that provide hiding places for juvenile fish.

The corals most likely to hold the shock are smooth, melon-shaped, pursued the researcher. These corals do not have too much trouble building their skeleton but "they are not very useful for habitat," adds Hugues.

During the bleaching of 2016, corals from the northern part of the Great barrier suffered a wave of "catastrophic deaths," the study continues.

"This coral dieback has caused radical changes in species diversity in hundreds of individual reefs, where mature and diverse reef communities are turning into more degraded systems, where only a few enduring species survive," writes Andrew Baird, other scientist

Bleaching is a phenomenon of withering which results in a discoloration of corals. Under the pressure of factors such as warming, stressed corals expel the algae with which they have a symbiotic relationship, and give them color and energy.

The study calls for the protection of surviving corals, estimated at about one billion .

"These are the ones who will recharge and re-inhabit altered reefs," says Hugues, adding that water quality needs to be improved by reducing coastal pollution.

to limit global warming as in the Paris agreement are also crucial.

"We had four bleaching episodes (1998, 2002, 2016 and 2017) on the Great Barrier with an overall temperature rise of 1 ° C," says Hugues. "If we continue with our emissions as if nothing had happened, I do not think the Barrier will survive it."

Reefs cover less than 0.2% of the ocean surface but are home to 30% of animal species and marine plants, protecting them from predators and serving as their pantry. They contribute to coastal protection, human nutrition, and tourism.

Nathalie Baye and other personalities to help the great apes

The primatologist Sabrina Krief, the actress Nathalie Baye or the entrepreneur Laurence Parisot called Monday Emmanuel Macron to take a series of measures to save the great apes, including several species whose critically endangered. [19659002AlongsidethechocolatierandsculptorPatrickRogerandtheParisianadvisorYannWehrlingtheyaskthegovernmentto"savethelastgreatapeslivinginthewildonourplanet"

Two gorilla species and two orangutans species are on the verge of extinction, according to the latest assessment by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). A third species has since been discovered and has about 800 individuals. The chimpanzee and the bonobo are considered to be in danger of extinction.

"The situation is catastrophic", was alarmed the primatologist, based in Uganda, who studies for 20 years chimpanzees, recalling that humans and large monkeys are "part of the same family, the hominids."

The main threats to these primates are deforestation for agriculture, illegal hunting for bushmeat and live animals, but also Pesticide-related or human-transmitted diseases

"Today is the time to act," said Sabrina Krief. "We are convinced that there are things to do in France".

They advocate the establishment of ten actions: "formally prohibit the use of great apes in research laboratories, shows, circuses, films" or on television, better fight against animal trafficking and bushmeat at Roissy Charles de Gaulle airport, "to guarantee the exemplary nature of French orders and public procurement" or to limit the import of products whose culture harms great apes, with the creation of 'a specific label.

The use of animals in shows' harms the image of great apes as wild animals', argued Ms Krief

France should be "one of the first countries to establish new legislation with regard to animals (…) with regard to great apes in particular ", pleaded Laurence Parisot. A law could give "a great ape-specific status" giving them the legal status of "non-human persons", continued the ex-president of the Medef

They also wish to see UNESCO recognize great apes as " World Heritage. "

Nathalie Baye and other personalities to help the great apes

The primatologist Sabrina Krief, the actress Nathalie Baye or the entrepreneur Laurence Parisot called Monday Emmanuel Macron to take a series of measures to save the great apes, including several species whose critically endangered. [19659002AlongsidethechocolatierandsculptorPatrickRogerandtheParisianadvisorYannWehrlingtheyaskthegovernmentto"savethelastgreatapeslivinginthewildonourplanet"

Two gorilla species and two orangutans species are on the verge of extinction, according to the latest assessment by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). A third species has since been discovered and has about 800 individuals. The chimpanzee and the bonobo are considered to be in danger of extinction.

"The situation is catastrophic", was alarmed the primatologist, based in Uganda, who studies for 20 years chimpanzees, recalling that humans and large monkeys are "part of the same family, the hominids."

The main threats to these primates are deforestation for agriculture, illegal hunting for bushmeat and live animals, but also Pesticide-related or human-transmitted diseases

"Today is the time to act," said Sabrina Krief. "We are convinced that there are things to do in France".

They advocate the establishment of ten actions: "formally prohibit the use of great apes in research laboratories, shows, circuses, films" or on television, better fight against animal trafficking and bushmeat at Roissy Charles de Gaulle airport, "to guarantee the exemplary nature of French orders and public procurement" or to limit the import of products whose culture harms great apes, with the creation of 'a specific label.

The use of animals in shows' harms the image of great apes as wild animals', argued Ms Krief

France should be "one of the first countries to establish new legislation with regard to animals (…) with regard to great apes in particular ", pleaded Laurence Parisot. A law could give "a great ape-specific status" giving them the legal status of "non-human persons", continued the ex-president of the Medef

They also wish to see UNESCO recognize great apes as " World Heritage. "