Mexico relies on solar for clean energy

At a distance, it looks like an ocean in the middle of the desert. It is not a mirage, however, but the largest solar park on the American continent, located in the state of Coahuila north of Mexico . The 2.3 million panels are arranged in rows on the sand and follow the path of the sun from sunrise to night, like sunflowers. They cover an area equivalent to 2,200 football fields. At the global level, only projects in China and India currently exceed their size.

Halving greenhouse gas emissions

Built by Italian Enel, the project cost $ 650 million dollars and responds to the Mexican government's strategy to produce 43% of its electricity through clean energy by 2024. Once fully operational by the end of the year, this solar park is expected to produce 1,700 gigawatts / hour, and to meet the energy needs of approximately 1.3 million Mexican households. Mexico received praise from environmentalists in 2015 when it became the first emerging country to announce an ambitious greenhouse gas reduction target of 30% by 2020, and 50% by 2050. [19659004] The photovoltaic park of Villanueva in the state of Coahuila in Mexico . AFP – Alfredo ESTRELLA

The authorities have auctioned three solar park projects that have generated investments estimated at $ 8.6 billion. In addition to Enel, the American Recurrent Energy and the Dutchman Alten, who are building a solar park in the state of Aguascalientes (center), have won these markets. The energy produced is expected to meet the needs of 6.5 million households in the country, according to official figures. This is an essential part of the Mexican energy reform approved at the end of 2013, which opened the private sector to the energy sector for the first time in just over 70 years.

Mexico looks to the sun to produce electricity

At a distance, it looks like an ocean in the middle of the desert. It is not a mirage, however, but the largest solar park on the American continent, located in the state of Coahuila in northern Mexico.

The 2.3 million panels are arranged in rows on the sand and follow the path of the sun from sunrise to night, like sunflowers.

They cover an area equivalent to 2,200 football fields. At the global level, only projects in China and India are currently larger than their size.

Built by the Italian Enel, the project cost $ 650 million and responds to the Mexican government's strategy to produce 43% of its electricity from clean energy by 2024.

Once fully operational By the end of the year, this solar park is expected to produce 1,700 gigawatts per hour, meeting the energy needs of approximately 1.3 million Mexican households.

Mexico received praise from environmentalists in 2015 when it became the first emerging country to announce an ambitious greenhouse gas reduction target of 30% by 2020, and 50% by 2050.

 The surface of the photovoltaic park of Villanueva is equivalent to that of 2,200 football fields. (AFP - Alfredo ESTRELLA)

The surface of the photovoltaic park of Villanueva is equivalent to that of 2,200 football fields. (AFP – Alfredo ESTRELLA)

The authorities have auctioned three solar park projects that have generated investments estimated at $ 8.6 billion.

In addition to Enel, the American Recurrent Energy and the Dutchman Alten, who built a solar park in the state of Aguascalientes (center), have won these markets.

The energy produced is expected to meet the needs of 6.5 million households in the country, according to official figures.

This is an essential part of the Mexican energy reform approved at the end of 2013, which opened up the private sector for the first time in just over 70 years.

Trump wants to deploy the army on the border with Mexico

Donald Trump claimed on Tuesday that he was ready to use the US Armed Forces to defend the southern border of United States with Mexico until that a wall be built and that a "real security" be assured.

"We will do things militarily," Trump told the White House press, adding that he discussed this idea with the Secretary of Defense James Mattis

"While waiting for a wall and real security, we are going to keep our border with the army, which is a big step forward," he said.

"We can not allow people to illegally enter our country, disappear and, incidentally, never go to court, "he continued.

Earlier in the day, Donald Trump announced that US aid to Honduras and other countries could be reinstated if they did not stop what he called a "caravan" of migrants.

Trump was referring to a group of 1.2000 Central Americans traveling across Mexico to the US border

Donald Trump multiplies inflammatory statements over the past few days on the theme of Latin American immigration, accusing Mexico of not taking the necessary measures and saying that if nothing is done to stop this "caravan" that could have consequences for the Alena treaty in which the United States, in his view, would play the role of "cash cow."

He also called on the Congress to act without delay to put pressure on the countries of the region assisted by the United States.

A Honduran leader on Tuesday responded to Donald Trump's accusations that he "does not understand what President Trump says when he says that Honduras is doing nothing" curbing illegal immigration

"I think he is misinformed. I think that he is unfairly using Honduras in his political debate with the Congress, "said Ebal Diaz, spokesman for the presidency of Honduras.

Mexico states that migrant groups Latin Americans fleeing violence related to organized gangs or drug trafficking, particularly in Honduras, have been in Mexican territory since 2010.

(With Reuters)

Canada and Mexico Reassure US About NAFTA Benefits

Canadian and Mexican senior officials expressed frustration with current American doubts about free trade, and said the benefits for the three countries should always be remembered during the current NAFTA renegotiation, the Associated Press reported Wednesday (21/2).

Canadian Ambassador to the United States David MacNaughton told a meeting of business and academic leaders at Arizona State University that better messages are needed to eliminate US concerns that the three countries successfully reorganize the North American Free Trade Agreement that has been in effect for 25 years .

He said the three countries should recognize that they can benefit by lowering tariffs and other barriers to international trade.

Ambassador Mario Chacon of Mexico promoting foreign trade and investment, told the group that the cause of the loss is largely American jobs is the result of technology, not free trade. "We lost our jobs because of robots, machines," Chacon said, adding that every country needs to train workers to fill new jobs in a developing economy. [as/al]

7.2 magnitude quake SR shakes Mexico, triggers light damage





Mexico City
 An earthquake of magnitude 7.2 on the Richter Scale (SR) shook Mexico. The quake triggered minor damage to buildings in the Oaxaca region of southern Mexico.

As reported by Reuters and AFP Saturday (17/2/2018), the epicenter was located 37 kilometers northeast of Pinotepa de Don Luis, Oaxaca, or close to the resort surfers on the Pacific coast. The US Geological Survey (USGS) notes the center is at a depth of 24.6 kilometers from the Earth's surface. This earthquake is not considered a potential tsunami.

Both the capital city of Mexico City and southern Mexico are still recovering after a powerful earthquake that triggered extensive damage in September 2017. Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto declared 'protocols have been activated' after this powerful earthquake struck.

There have been no reports of casualties due to the recent earthquake that rocked on Friday (16/2) this local time. Mexican Interior Minister Alfonso Navarrete said the quake triggered minor damage to buildings in Oaxaca.

Media uploaded photos show bricks and debris falling from buildings. The products at the local supermarket are also seen falling off the shelves. This earthquake tremor is felt to the territory of Guatemala, which is in southern Mexico.

In Mexico City, high-rise buildings rocked for more than a minute due to this earthquake. Earthquake warning alarm goes off. It was reported that some old buildings in the Condesa region had a small rift after the earthquake shook. Trees, power lines and cars also swayed as the quake struck.

Frantic locals rush out of the building and gather on the streets. They are still traumatized by two large earthquakes that shook in September 2017 and killed a total of 465 people.

"Honestly, we were all a little annoyed, we started crying every time the alarm went off, we were stressed, we remembered the earthquake before, so we ran out onto the street. Valladolid (38) who lives in La Roma, Mexico City.

Julia Hernandez calls the quake vibration she feels makes her like in a ship. "Will this stop?" he said. "We live in fear, with memories of what happened before," said Hernandez's daughter.

(nvc / dnu)


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