Tara: a turbine to remind the importance of research on the ocean

Faced with the difficulties it encounters to finance its scientific expeditions, the Tara Foundation has placed a turbine that generates electricity at the bottom of the water, off Brittany in the Morbihan, where the current is strong, explains Romain Troublé, director general of the Tara Expéditions Foundation in a video

A drop of water

The turbine powers a computer capable of securing transactions in bitcoin . Each recorded transaction generates money, reinvested in research on the ocean . " The environment represents less than 3% of donations made to charities ", says the private foundation that studies the impact of global warming on the ocean. She had the idea, with FF Creative Community Los Angeles, " to use the energy of the sea to raise money " with its installation "Ocean miner". In one month, the facility has raised 200 euros, " a drop of water in the ocean ," says the Foundation. " This installation will not under any circumstances cover the needs of scientific research ", explains Romain Troublé in a statement but that " can recall that only the mobilization of all will fund research to study, understand and better preserve the ocean tomorrow ". For 15 years, the foundation has sought to better understand the impact of climate change on the ocean and thus better preserve it.

His schooner has already traveled the Arctic to study the pack ice, sailing in all the seas of the globe discover plankton or crisscross the Mediterranean to measure the impact of plastic pollution. She is currently crossing the Pacific to study coral reefs threatened by climate change and human activities.

Tara uses the ocean to fund her research

Faced with the difficulties it faces in financing its scientific expeditions, the Tara Foundation is putting the ocean to work, a way to recall the importance of donations for marine research.

A turbine that generates energy Electricity was placed at the bottom of the water, off Brittany in the Morbihan, where the current is strong, explains Romain Troublé, General Manager of the Tara Expeditions Foundation in a video.

The turbine powers a computer able to secure bitcoin transactions. Each recorded transaction generates money, reinvested in ocean research.

"The environment represents less than 3% of donations made to charities", says the private foundation that studies the impact of global warming

So she had the idea, with FF Creative Community Los Angeles, "to use the energy of the sea to raise money" with her installation "Ocean miner" ).

 The ship of scientific expeditions Tara, May 28, 2016 in the port of Lorient (AFP / Archives - FRED TANNEAU)

The ship of scientific expeditions Tara, May 28, 2016 in the port of Lorient (AFP / Archives – FRED TANNEAU)

In one month, the installation has raised 200 €, "a drop of water in the ocean", underlines the Foundation.

"This installation will not under any circumstances cover the needs scientific research ", explains Romain Troublé in a statement but this" allows to remember that only the mobilization of all will fund research to study, understand and better preserve the ocean tomorrow ".

For 15 years, the foundation has sought to better understand the impact of climate change on the ocean and thus better preserve it.

His schooner has already traveled the Arctic to study the pack ice, sailed in all seas of the globe to discover the plankton or crisscrossed the Mediterranean to measure the impact of plastic pollution.

She currently crosses the Pacific to study coral reefs, threatened by climate change and human activities.

In Bali, a diver films an ocean of plastic waste

Ah, Bali … its white sand beaches, its volcanic reliefs … and its hundreds of marine litter. The splendid turquoise waters of "the island of the gods" look more and more like a plastic discharge . Rich Horner is the witness. An amateur diver, he filmed in March 2018 one of his marine trips to Manta Point, on the small island of Nusa Penida. The waters of this island in the Balinese province are usually popular for their rich manta rays. The tourist had the unpleasant surprise of being in the middle of a bench of plastic waste. On Facebook the Briton comments his video with a sarcastic message: "The currents of the ocean brought us a beautiful gift with jellyfish, plankton, leaves, branches, palms, stems, etc. Oh, and plastic. " The image is impressive, especially when a manta ray and a jellyfish cross the field. And the diver to bid: "Plastic bags, still plastic bags, plastic, plastic, so much plastic!"

And these wastes represent only a part of the iceberg. Gede Hendrawa, researcher in oceanography at Udayana University in Bali, pollution alert on a smaller scale. "Wastes disturb the tourists from an aesthetic point of view but the problem of plastic is much more serious than that: microplastics can contaminate fish which, if eaten by humans, can cause problems health like cancer ".

The diver's experience is far from a single episode. It highlights an already well-known phenomenon in Bali, whose reputation pales by the growing presence of rubbish on its beaches. Local authorities have declared the island of 4 million inhabitants in "state of emergency waste" in November 2017. Nearly 700 cleaning employees and 36 trucks are mobilized every day. the shore of Kuta Beach. The problem, however, is of greater magnitude: Indonesia is the second largest producer of plastic marine litter after China. This represents 1.29 million tonnes thrown into the sea every year! With its 17,000 or so islands, the largest archipelago has pledged in 2017 to the UN to reduce its marine pollution by 70%. Manta rays will appreciate the gesture.

A diver films an ocean of garbage in the waters of Bali

Millions of tourists flock every year to the sandy beaches of Bali's Indonesian island, but a video shot by a British diver highlights a worrying problem: clear waters stained with plastic waste. [19659002] This underwater video made this week by Rich Horner shows the diver swimming underwater amidst hundreds of plastic garbage and other debris at Manta Point, on the small island of Nusa Penida, southeast of Bali , where tourists come to observe the manta rays.

"The currents of the ocean brought us a beautiful gift with jellyfish, plankton, leaves, branches, palms, stems, etc … Oh, and plastic" , wrote the diver not ironically on his Facebook account.

All kinds of plastics – including bottles, goblets and straws – floated around him.

"Plastic bags, still plastic bags , plastic, pl astique, so much plastic! ", he added.

The mounds of garbage that accumulate on the beaches are damaging to Bali's reputation, presented as a dream island with turquoise waters, and highlight the rubbish problem in Indonesia

The fourth most populated country in the world with some 255 million inhabitants, this Southeast Asian archipelago is the world's second largest producer of marine litter after China, with 1.29 million tonnes per annum thrown at sea, causing immense damage to ecosystems and health.

For I Gede Hendrawa, researcher in oceanography at Udayana University in Bali, "the waste disturbs tourists by one point But the problem of plastic is much more serious than that: microplastics can contaminate fish that, if eaten by humans, can cause health problems such as cancer. "

Failure to Survive, US Spy Satellite Falls into the Indian Ocean





New York
 The US spy satellite carried by SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket failed to survive in its orbit. The satellite is now known to have fallen into the Indian Ocean.

It was submitted officially by the US Government, as quoted from ABC News, Thursday (11/1/2018). The spy satellite, named Zuma, was launched on Sunday (7/1).

Reported by Reuters, Zuma allegedly completely lost undetected again since Monday (8/1). Intelligence satellite made by Northrop Grumman Corp. is called worth billions of dollars.

The SpaceX party says there is nothing wrong with their artificial rocket. "The rocket has done everything right," SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell said.

"The data checked so far indicates no design, operational or other changes," he added.

SpaceX is a US space transportation company formed by billionaire Elon Musk. Scheduled SpaceX will launch Falcon Heavy, a mission that brings people into space by the end of 2018. Mentioned 'failure' Falcon 9 will not affect other SpaceX launches.
 
(rna / abw)